, , “"Tipping Point" Part 1”

Our podcast today was recorded in front of a live audience on December 10, 2019, at The Wilma in Missoula, MT. 8 storytellers shared their true personal story on the theme “Tipping Point”. Today we hear from three of those storytellers.

Note that the quality of the sound is not as perfect as we would like it to be. These stories are really worthwhile and we want you to hear them. Thank you.

In our first story, Annabelle Winne wakes in the middle of the night with the sensation of water in her ear. She soon discovers that the cause of the sensation is worse than she could have imagined. She calls her story “Insanity in my Ear”.

Annabelle Winne moved to Montana 9 years ago, in part, because she only lives in states that start with the letter “M.” Previously, she lived in Maine, Massachusetts and (New) Mexico. She currently works as a clinical social worker in private practice. Past jobs have included research biologist, waitress and burrito roller.

Our next storyteller is Feather Sherman, who falls out of a tree on a camping trip, and is saved from breaking her neck, by an unlikely accomplice. She calls her story “Tree of Enlightenment”.

Feather Sherman earned her Masters in Art Education from the University of Montana. She has a 50-year career, teaching art, and raising her five, wonderful children. She’s passionate about WORLD PEACE, ART and music. For the last seven years, she has devoted her life to being a Volunteer of Loving Kindness and works for free. Living very simply, she has helped with American and World Peace Gatherings, Oceti [SACK-OH-WIN] Sakowin Media Crew at Standing Rock, and Rainbow Hurricane Disaster Relief Kitchens.

Our final storyteller is Greg Munro who, along with his wife, embarks on an adoption journey that results in the very first open adoption in the state of Montana. Greg calls his story “The Tipping Point for Secrecy in Infant Adoptions”.

Greg Munro is the father of two adopted daughters who are now adults with children of their own. In a long career as a trial lawyer, including 30 years as a law professor at the University of Montana, he has made storytelling the core of his advocacy and is awed by this ancient and beautiful communication.