, , “Leap of Faith - Part 1”

Our podcast today was recorded in front of a live audience on September 24, 2019 at The Wilma in Missoula, MT. 8 storytellers shared their true personal story on the theme “Leap of Faith”.

Our first story comes to us from Karl Stein, who shares his tale of falling in love with the rhythm of the tracks, riding trains from Montana to California and back while trying to avoid the yard bulls. He calls his story “Vagabond”.

Karl Stein started painting when he was ten years old after inheriting his grandfather’s oil paints. In 1969 a Grizzly football scholarship brought him to Montana where he set nine school records his first year, including the still standing single season interception record, earning him all American honors and induction into the Grizzly Hall of Fame as part of the championship 1969-18970 team. Known as “sky thief” he may be the only Griz player who was an art major, and performed with the University Modern Dance Company. Karl lives with his family next to tribal forest lands of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, where he loves to paint, sculpt, play music, garden, eat toast and jam, run, follow black bears and ski out his back door.

 

Our next story comes to us from Tomi Cook whose downward spiral into addiction is transcended when her drug dealer takes a leap of faith of his own and treats Tomi with compassion. This is Tomi’s story of healing and grace. She calls her story “One Leap At a Time”.

A warning for our more sensitive listeners, Tomi shares openly and with frank language about suicide and drug use.

If you or someone you know needs help with depression or suicidal thoughts, you can call the National Lifeline 1.800.273.TALK. If you or someone you know struggles with addiction, you can find help at addictionresource.com.

 

Tomi Cook recently graduated from the clinical mental health master’s program at the University of Montana  and then landed her dream job at Open Aid Alliance. She’s a native New Yorker who spent the early parts of her life moving around the country, including several years in Japan before she found Montana, not by choice, but by luck.

In our final story, Anna Haslund performs a daring horse rescue on a forest service road in Montana. Anna calls her story “Joe + Balthazar”. Note that Anna is deaf, and you may hear her voice in the background of the American Sign Language interpreter who is voicing Anna’ story.

 

Anna Haslund loves to help the community with her kindness! She is the one who breaks the barrier and who can do the impossible. Watch out for her crazy skill with yassss kicks! Her nickname is Anna Banana!