By participating in Tell Us Something I discovered something new: I can also gain and retain tremendously by telling my own stories. What previously felt like small spinets of my life, with little context, shared through disjointed conversations over the years have transformed into powerful insights about myself and what is most important to me. Tell Us Something challenged me to find my story; focus on what I really wanted to say and why; then share it with a large, supportive group. And the absolute best part is witnessing how each story blends with those of others into a communal experience. Powerful medicine.
— Jack Rowan, Tell Us Something storyteller
I simply lost myself in my own story. I was vulnerable, open, making mistakes, telling people about my fear and they were loving it. It connected me with my own community in a way nothing else does. It seems like sharing stories serves as an opening to the vulnerability in all of us and links us together like only hearing something personal about someone can.
— Kim Maynard, Tell Us Something storyteller
Stepping up on the stage for the first time was one of the scariest risks I have ever taken. It was so good for me to share my stories... Anytime I challenge myself to face my fears, which public speaking is one I grow as a thinking, compassionate human.
— Stepahnie Wing, Tell Us Something storyteller
I shared a story that was important to me to a packed house. It felt good. But what felt even better were the minutes before going on stage, chatting with other storytellers, boosting each other up, and briefly feeling linked to people that I most likely wouldn’t have met otherwise. I’m very grateful for my experience with Tell Us Something.
— Carley Fetzer, Tell Us Something storyteller